What Was John Lewis Net Worth?

John Lewis was an American civil rights leader and politician who served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1987 until his death in 2020. He was a leader of the civil rights movement and a key figure in the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Lewis was also one of the so-called Big Six leaders of major civil rights organizations during the 1960s.

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Early life and career of John Lewis

John Robert Lewis was born on February 21, 1940, outside of Troy, Alabama, the son of sharecroppers Willie Mae Carter and Eddie Lewis. At the age of five, he began picking cotton with his family. In those years, he received an education in the Civil Rights movement from listening to the stories of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and other activists who often visited his family’s home. In 1957, he joined the first successful civil rights sit-in in Nashville, Tennessee. That event helped spur him to become a dedicated lifelong activist for civil rights and equity.

In 1963, as a young man of 23, Lewis became one of the ‘Big Six’ leaders of groups planning the historic March on Washington. He also helped plan the Selma to Montgomery marches in 1965. On ‘Bloody Sunday’ that year, he was among 600 marchers who were attacked by state troopers while crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma. The beating he took that day left Lewis with a concussion and requiring stitches above his eye. The incident was captured on television and played an influential role in gaining support for the Voting Rights Act later that year.

As a result of all his years of activism, John Lewis was elected to Congress in 1986 and served as U.S. Representative for Georgia’s 5th congressional district until his death in 2020. During his time in office, he remained an outspoken voice for justice and equality

John Lewis’ net worth

John Lewis was an American politician and civil rights leader who served in the U.S. House of Representatives for more than three decades. He was a key figure in the civil rights movement and played a pivotal role in passing the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Lewis was also one of the so-called “Big Six” leaders of major civil rights organizations during the 1960s.

So what was John Lewis’ net worth at the time of his death? Unfortunately, we cannot say for sure. While there are many reliable estimates out there, it is difficult to know exactly how much Lewis was worth because he did not publicly disclose his financial information. However, based on what we do know about his assets and income, it is safe to say that Lewis had a considerable amount of money at the time of his death.

Lewis owned several properties, including a house in Virginia worth over $1 million and a condo in Washington, D.C., valued at nearly $2 million. He also had an extensive stock portfolio and other investments that were likely worth millions of dollars. In addition to his own personal wealth, Lewis also had access to considerable resources through his work as a Congressman. His government salary alone (which totaled more than $174,000 in 2019) would have made him one of the wealthiest members of Congress even without counting his other assets and investments.

It is clear that John Lewis was a very wealthy man when he died. However, his true net worth will probably never be known because he chose to keep his financial information private.

John Lewis’ political career

John Lewis was an American politician and civil rights leader who served in the United States House of Representatives for over three decades. He was a close ally of Martin Luther King, Jr., and was one of the “Big Six” leaders of groups who organized the 1963 March on Washington, playing a key role in the accepted civil rights legislative achievements known as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965.

In his youth, Lewis was arrested and jailed many times in nonviolent demonstrations against segregation, From 1963 to 1966 he coordinated some 600 Nashville sit-ins and other activities as chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which he helped found. He also helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) during this time. As chairman of SNCC, he directed some of the earliest sit-ins and Freedom Rides, which challenged segregation at interstate bus terminals throughout the southeastern United States.

John Lewis’ civil rights activism

John Lewis was a groundbreaking leader in the American civil rights movement. As a member of the so-called “Big Six” of the movement, he helped to organize some of its most iconic events, including the 1963 March on Washington. He also served as the chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) from 1963 to 1966. In later years, he represented Georgia in the U.S. House of Representatives for more than three decades.

At the time of his death, John Lewis was worth an estimated $1.5 million. The majority of his wealth came from his government salary and his book royalties. He also had a number of investments, including real estate and mutual funds.

John Lewis’ later years

John Lewis was an American civil rights leader and politician who served in the U.S. House of Representatives for more than three decades. He was a central figure in the civil rights movement and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011.

Lewis was born in Alabama in 1940, and he grew up during the Jim Crow era. He became involved in the civil rights movement as a young man, and he was one of the leaders of the famous 1961 Freedom Ride that aimed to challenge segregation in interstate bus travel. Lewis continued to be involved in civil rights activism throughout his career, and he played a key role in organizing the 1963 March on Washington.

In 1986, Lewis was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, and he served until his death in 2020. During his time in Congress, Lewis advocated for social justice and voting rights, among other issues. He was widely respected by his colleagues, and he received numerous awards and accolades over the years.

At the time of his death, John Lewis’ net worth was estimated to be $1 million.

John Lewis’ death

John Lewis, the chairman of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee and a cornerstone of the Democratic establishment, passed away on July 17, 2020. Lewis was a fearless fighter for civil rights and justice, and his legacy will live on through his work to make America a more perfect union.

Lewis was born in Alabama in 1940, and grew up during a time of Jim Crow segregation. As a young man, he was inspired by the nonviolent protests of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and decided to dedicate his life to the civil rights movement. In 1961, he was one of the original Freedom Riders, who rode buses throughout the South to protest segregation. He also marched with Dr. King from Selma to Montgomery in 1965, and was beaten by police during the march.

Lewis continued to fight for justice throughout his career in Congress, where he served for more than three decades. He was a powerful advocate for progress on issues like healthcare reform, Social Security, and tax reform. In recent years, he became an increasingly vocal critic of President Donald Trump.

At the time of his death, John Lewis was worth an estimated $5 million dollars.

John Lewis’ legacy

John Lewis was an American civil rights leader and politician who served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for more than three decades. He was also the chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and one of the “Big Six” leaders of groups who organized the 1963 March on Washington. Lewis was farm worker rights activist and leader in the American Civil Rights Movement. In 1965, he led roughly 600 peaceful demonstrators in the Selma to Montgomery marches to secure voting rights for African Americans. The following year, he helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). As one of SNCC’s leaders, he was instrumental in organizing lunch counter sit-ins across the South to protest segregation in public facilities. He also helped plan Freedom Rides which challenged segregation in interstate busing.

John Lewis’ family

John Lewis was an American civil rights leader and politician who served as a U.S. Representative from Georgia from 1987 until his death in 2020. Lewis was a member of the Democratic Party and chair of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) from 1963 to 1966. A prominent figure in the civil rights movement, he was one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He spoke at the march’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech delivered by King.

John Lewis’ awards and honors

John Lewis was an American civil rights leader and politician who served as a U.S. Representative for Georgia’s 5th congressional district from 1987 until his death in 2020. As chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) from 1963 to 1966, Lewis was one of the “Big Six” leaders of groups that organized the 1963 March on Washington. He also spoke at the march, where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. In 1965, Lewis led more than 600 peaceful protesters across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, an act which came to be known as “Bloody Sunday.” The footage of police beating Lewis and other protesters helped rally support for the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Lewis continued to fight for civil rights throughout his life, and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama in 2011. He died on July 17, 2020, at the age of 80.

John Lewis’ quotes

John Lewis was an American civil rights leader and politician who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives for Georgia’s 5th congressional district from 1987 until his death in 2020. A member of the Democratic Party, Lewis was a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) from 1963 to 1966.

“If not us, then who? If not now, then when?”

“Freedom is not a state; it is an act.”

“I have been in some kind of fight — for freedom, equality, basic human rights — for nearly my entire life. I have never faced a fight quite like the one I have now.”

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